Very cheap chat lines


22-Jan-2020 15:44

He remembers being in a meeting with 25 or so of the first national pay-per-call developers when someone asked how many people in the room were millionaires. In contrast to the early web, where content was free, the 900 number business began with a business model—charge for content by the minute.

By 1989, AT&T, MCI, Sprint, and a smaller carrier called Telesphere had opened up 900 numbers to the masses, so anyone with a bit of start-up cash could start a line.

But instead of offering it for free alongside poorly-performing ads, 900 numbers supported content creators.

A typical call cost

He remembers being in a meeting with 25 or so of the first national pay-per-call developers when someone asked how many people in the room were millionaires. In contrast to the early web, where content was free, the 900 number business began with a business model—charge for content by the minute.By 1989, AT&T, MCI, Sprint, and a smaller carrier called Telesphere had opened up 900 numbers to the masses, so anyone with a bit of start-up cash could start a line.But instead of offering it for free alongside poorly-performing ads, 900 numbers supported content creators.A typical call cost $1.99 for the first minute, and 99 cents for each additional minute.While expensive and technologically limited, for a few boom years, 900 numbers that charged by the minute filled a gap for people who required daily updates on nearly anything.From the score in the fifth inning of a Yankees game to surfing conditions in southern California to the latest news from DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince, 900 numbers were an information revelation before they finally died in 2012.Bentz or one of his colleagues would go to all the big pay-per-view events, like Wrestle Mania, and interview the stars.“When the wrestlers came out of the ring,” says Bentz, “their first stop was to be interviewed for the 900 number hotline.” In addition to sports, personals, and chat lines, 900 numbers were also useful for information providers who could fill odd niches.

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He remembers being in a meeting with 25 or so of the first national pay-per-call developers when someone asked how many people in the room were millionaires. In contrast to the early web, where content was free, the 900 number business began with a business model—charge for content by the minute.

By 1989, AT&T, MCI, Sprint, and a smaller carrier called Telesphere had opened up 900 numbers to the masses, so anyone with a bit of start-up cash could start a line.

But instead of offering it for free alongside poorly-performing ads, 900 numbers supported content creators.

A typical call cost $1.99 for the first minute, and 99 cents for each additional minute.

While expensive and technologically limited, for a few boom years, 900 numbers that charged by the minute filled a gap for people who required daily updates on nearly anything.

From the score in the fifth inning of a Yankees game to surfing conditions in southern California to the latest news from DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince, 900 numbers were an information revelation before they finally died in 2012.

.99 for the first minute, and 99 cents for each additional minute.

While expensive and technologically limited, for a few boom years, 900 numbers that charged by the minute filled a gap for people who required daily updates on nearly anything.

From the score in the fifth inning of a Yankees game to surfing conditions in southern California to the latest news from DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince, 900 numbers were an information revelation before they finally died in 2012.

who they thought won the Ronald Reagan-Jimmy Carter presidential debate.

“You want to save Larry the Lobster,” Murphy told the viewers, “dial 1-900-720-1808. Now, unless you call in to save him, we’re going to boil Larry’s little butt right here on national television…The phone company is going to charge you 50 cents, but isn’t it worth 50 cents to save Larry’s life?

Or look at it this way: Isn’t it worth half a buck to see us boil Larry on TV?

For 50 cents, viewers could call one of two numbers, and AT&T recorded the number of calls to each to determine who the audience felt was the winner.

Information services, where people could call a 900 number and hear a recorded or live message, were also coming into their own in the early- and mid-1980s.

In 1993, there were more than 10,000 900 numbers in operation.