Against company policy dating co worker


20-Nov-2019 16:08

This page provides answers to many common questions about off-duty conduct, but for issues with off-duty conduct it is always advisable to have a local attorney look at your case. I recently came out as gay and when my employer found out I was fired. It depends on the activity involved, and whether that activity has any legal protection under your state's laws.

To learn more about your rights with respect to off-duty conduct, read below: 1. Is there anything I can write about in my blog that I cannot be fired for? I have a second job on weekends, which never interferes with my work for my full-time employer. I smoke medical marijuana in a state where it's legal, however, my employer fired me for testing positive for marijuana. Generally speaking, if there is no law specifically protecting you from being fired for the activity under consideration, and if you are not a union or governmental employee with special protection against being fired without a reason, then you are employed at will.

However, whether blogging falls under the list of protected activities has yielded varying results in case law. A new trend is increasingly taking hold, where companies looking to reduce their health care costs have established not just a "no smoking" policy, but a "no smokers" policy.

These companies not only refuse to hire smokers, but some are even taking the drastic step of terminating current employees who smoke.

However, if you are interested in one of your coworkers, you can date them by first initiating a romance, maintaining professional boundaries, and working to develop your relationship.

Dating coworkers has always been a contentious issue in business and it’s come front and center in the debate around #Me Too.

Instead, other areas of the law, such as discrimination, drug testing, and harassment laws, protect an employee's off-duty conduct. I recently tried to get promoted to a managerial position but I was denied because I would be supervising my husband.

Therefore, each different off-duty conduct issue must be looked at carefully. A co-worker is sending me harassing emails through his personal account while off-duty. So I tried applying to a different company but they wouldn't hire me because my husband works for the competitor. The answer to this seemingly simple question is: it depends.

This issue can sometimes fall into a gray area, but the answer is probably yes, your employer can restrict you from moonlighting, whether through its personnel policy or by requiring that you sign a non-compete agreement that limits the type of work you can do for anyone other than your current employer.If you value your job and truly want to quit smoking, you may want to take advantage of these additional incentives, or you may want to look for a new job without such restrictive policies.Generally, an employer can fire you for having a personal website or blog that it deems inappropriate, with very limited exceptions.If the answer is not a resounding “yes,” they’re out of luck and need to move on.

According to Facebook’s global head of employment law, Heidi Swartz, “ambiguous” responses like “I’m busy” or “I can’t tonight” count as a “no.” That hopefully takes the whole “he said, she said” out of the exchange.

If you're whistleblowing--reporting the employer's unlawful conduct--you may have some protection if you've reported it to a government agency first.